The Complete Guide to ACT English
  • Author : Erica L. Meltzer
  • Release Date : 28 April 2013
  • Publisher : Createspace Independent Pub
  • Genre : Study Aids
  • Pages : 272
  • ISBN 13 : 1484831454

Download or read book entitled The Complete Guide to ACT English written by Erica L. Meltzer and published by Createspace Independent Pub online. This book was released on 28 April 2013 with total pages 272. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Written by a top tutor whose students regularly achieve ACT English scores in the mid-30s, The Complete Guide to ACT English is the only book that offers a comprehensive review of all ACT grammar and rhetoric topics. Includes step-by-step explanations of errors in all their forms; dozens of ACT-style exercises that help you move from understanding rules to applying them in context; and cumulative reviews that allow you to practice a progressively wider range of concepts in a passage. Also includes a complete index of English questions from The Real Guide to the ACT, grouped both by topic and by test. Errata for books purchased prior to 8/25/14: p. 35 incorrectly states that when "however" or "therefore" is used to begin a clause, it should only follow a semicolon and not a period. The ACT is actually somewhat inconsistent with this rule: grammar questions that ask test-takers to join two complete sentences will provide only "semicolon + however/therefore" as a correct answer choice. The construction "period + However/Therefore" will not appear as an answer choice. In contrast, on (rhetoric) questions that test meaning rather than grammar, the ACT considers the construction "period + However/Therefore" acceptable. For example, consider the following: The first tomatoes, grown in South America as early as 500 B.C., were small and golden. Therefore, the tomatoes grown today are large and red. A. NO CHANGE B. However, C. Meanwhile D. Likewise, Choice (B) is correct because it is the only option that indicates a contrast between the two sentences. The fact that "however" is preceded by a period rather than a semicolon would not be considered problematic.